Locus Events are Going Virtual!

Online events at Locus Workspace are stronger than ever! One of our top priorities is to keep events alive to maintain our well-known sense of community among our coworking members and add value to their memberships. Locus’ goal is to help freelancers, digital nomads, remote workers and other location-independent professionals be more productive and work better. Despite these challenging times, we wanted to make sure to keep up that spirit, and that’s why we’ve gone virtual!

Keep reading for a full list of all our virtual events…

Virtual

“Focus @ Locus” Group Pomodoro Work Meetup 

Are you more focused and productive when you work alongside friends or colleagues? Then join our daily “Focus @ Locus” virtual meetup and work alongside a small group of other Locus Workspace members while we practice the Pomodoro technique.

How does it work?

At the beginning of each meeting we’ll share our goals for the work session (2-hour session on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and 3.5-hour session on Wednesdays). We will work as a group for 25 minutes at a time with a 5 minute break, or 55 minutes with a 5 minute break if you want take every other break, and repeat! At the end of the session, we’ll evaluate whether our goals have been reached.

The Pomodoro technique has helped millions of people to improve their time management, making them more productive and focused. So why not you?

👨‍👧‍👧 Members

📆 Every weekday

🕒 Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri: from 9:00 to 11:00 am; Wednesdays from 9:00 to 12:30 pm

💻 Meeting via Skype and Telegram

How to join? Ask a community manager and you’ll be all set!

 

Czech Conversation Classes 

Would you like to improve your conversational Czech? Then consider joining our online Czech conversation classes along with other international Locus members.

How does it work?

For one hour you will have the chance to practice your speaking skills with a native teacher in a small group with other Locus members. Subjects change every week and are sometimes based on the latest news to keep the content as varied as possible while helping you retain new vocabulary on different topics.

👨‍👧‍👧 Members

📆 Every Friday

🕒 From 2:00 to 3:00 pm

💻 Meeting via Zoom

💰 Try out one class for free. After that, commitment is month by month (participants let everyone know by the start of each calendar month using a shared Google sheet if they’ll miss any – or all – classes for the upcoming month). The hourly rate is 600 Kc + VAT, which is shared among members based on their relative number of committed hours each month. For example, if there is an average of 4 students per class, it would cost you 150 Kc / 60-minute lesson.

How to join? Ask a community manager or send an email to cesky@locusworkspace.com

 

Critique-Free Writing Meetup

Can’t you make yourself sit for a couple of hours to write down a few pages? Do you get distracted easily? Are you facing deadlines and need to work over the weekend as well?

If you answered YES to any of these questions, the Critique-Free Writing Meetup may be just a thing for you. Set up your calendar to “busy” for next Saturday and join this writing meetup. It is meant for everyone who needs to do any kind of a writing activity, e.g. write an article for the newspaper, a blog post, a thesis, an academic paper or even a novel.

At the beginning of the session, the participants introduce themselves briefly, mention what they are currently working on and set goals they want to reach on that day. At the end of session, everybody tries to sum up whether they succeeded in accomplishing the set goals.

Even if the session is running virtually right now, you can feel the sense of community – a group of people working on a similar goal. It motivates you to get things done the sooner the better and help you keep the perseverance in writing.

👨‍👧‍👧 Members & Non-Members

📆 Every Saturday

🕒 From 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

💻 Meeting via Facebook

How to join? Register via Meetup HERE (look for the next “Critique-Free Writing Group” meetup) or contact Sonya Lano on Facebook or Messenger to add you to FB Writing Meetup chat group.

 

Prague Writers Group

At a certain stage of the writing process, every author needs some feedback on their work. That is exactly what you can get by joining Prague Writers Group! This group is tailed for writers who are in-process of writing a longer work or novel of any genre. You can submit any piece of work you need a feedback on.

The submission should not exceed 3500 words though and should be done by Thursday evening. It allows other members of the group to have enough time (till Saturday evening) to read it through and give you an objective feedback. Even though you may not always have time to read everyone’s texts through, join anyway!

👨‍👧‍👧 Members & Non-Members

📆 Every Saturday

🕒 From 5:30 to 9:00 pm

💻 Meeting via Skype

How to join? Register via Meetup HERE (look for the next “Prague Writers Group” meetup) or contact Sonya Lano on Facebook or Messenger to add you to the Skype group and give you access to the Dropbox folder.

 

Remember you can always check what’s happening at Locus in the Calendar of Events that you will find on our website.

 

Any of these sound interesting? Would you like to join our members only events? Then get a VIRTUAL MEMBERSHIP at Locus Workspace and:

  • Become part of the Locus community
  • Participate in our members only events
  • Use the large meeting room 1hr./month for FREE
  • Work from our coworking space 1 day/month for FREE
  • Get member prices for meeting room reservations (both small and large meeting rooms)
  • Possibility of meeting rooms reservations 24/7
  • Use day passes from midnight to midnight any day of the week

See All Benefits

 

Come write at Locus for NaNoWriMo on Sundays in November!

By Beth Green

“Um, why?”

That’s the question I hear most frequently about NaNoWriMo, the month-long challenge to write a novel in a month.
The implication is: Why try to write a whole novel in a month? Aren’t novels, you know, hard?

The question is usually accompanied by a blank, blinking stare as the other person wonders, belatedly, what kind of madness they’ve run across.

But that’s okay because National Novel Writing Month is one of these challenges that is, by design, a little extreme.
Like an all-weekend coding challenge, a vertical terrain race though mud, a bid to cook the world’s largest omelet, a challenge to drink a beer at the closest hospoda to each of Prague’s metro stations—NaNoWriMo is meant to help you push your own boundaries. Find your extreme, and hit it.

NaNoWriMo is here! I'll be hosting Write-ins (with official swag, yeah!) in Prague at Locus Workspace. Please join if…

Geplaatst door Beth Green Writes op Donderdag 1 november 2018

NaNoWriMo presumes that every one of us—and yes, gentle reader, that means you too!—possesses the tools we need to write a novel in the 30 days from November first to 30th. For the purpose of the challenge, a novel is defined as 50,000 words, an average of 1,667 per day.

That’s the why of NaNoWriMo, at least for me. It’s a place to believe in yourself, to believe you can reach that distant target and show it who is boss. (You’re the boss, if I’m not making myself clear).

If you’ve been to Locus on Saturdays, you might have heard the pleasant tap-tap-tap of the keyboards of the Prague Writers Group at their usual critique-free write ins. (They write from 9 to 5 with a break for lunch; all are welcome). And in November, thanks to Will Bennis’ continued support of our challenge and our big, wordy dreams, we’ll also be adding to our word courts on Sundays (in the big conference room, from 9 to 5, MeetUp links below). Locus Workspace is an official NaNoWriMo Come Write In location for the 2019 challenge.

Join us in November and find out your reason why!

About NaNoWriMo

Started by a group of friends in San Francisco in 1999, NaNoWriMo now has more than 400,000 participants each year. Each November the main 50,000-word-goal challenge is held, and smaller challenges take place throughout the year. All challenges are free to join. Sign up at nanowrimo.org.

About the Locus Write Ins

When: Every Sunday (Nov. 3, 10, 17, and 24) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

Where: Locus big meeting room

Cost: Free

Organizers: Beth Green, Sonya Lano, Sarah Shaw

Planning to come? Let us know on MeetUp:

Locus’s Guide to Prague’s Christmas Markets

Christmas Markets in Prague 2019 - Best Time

On Sunday, December 1st, Locus is organizing a get together to explore the Christmas Markets of Prague (learn more and register to attend).

That seems like a perfect reason to write a blog post about Prague’s amazing Christmas Markets!

Do you want to visit them? Here are a couple of reasons why your answer should be YES.

There is no doubt that Prague is one of the most beautiful European destinations all year round, the Christmas period is no exception. Winter brings some magic into the city when everything is covered with lights, (ideally) snow and the aroma of the Czech Christmas treats makes it the perfect magical wintertime location. The famous Prague’s Christmas Market is the best place to go to experience the atmosphere, hang out with friends and family or do some last-minute gift shopping for the loved ones. It doesn’t matter if you’re a tourist or if you’re already established in Prague; the Christmas Market is a popular place for both visitors and locals and is definitely a MUST DO activity if you are in town. After the official Christmas tree lighting ceremony, the markets will be open until the 6th of January, which gives you plenty of time to visit. If you’re still in doubt or would like to know what’s in it for you, here are some reasons and tips on why you should visit Prague’s Christmas Markets this year.

  1. Best place indeed

The Christmas Market in Prague has been voted among Europe’s top 10. Despite a drop in its rating, Prague’s Christmas Market is still beating Europe’s most popular travel destinations such as London or Paris. The medieval atmosphere and familiar feel are the elements that bring people in. Nothing seems to be better than getting cozy in the old streets of the beautiful city.

  1. Go local

Tourism in Prague is massive, and Christmas time is no exception. People from all over the world come here to experience the city and markets, so it can get crowded. No worries! There are plenty of smaller, local Christmas markets where you can treat yourself and experience the amazing atmosphere to the fullest. You can find those at Náměstí Míru or Tylovo náměstí close to I.P. Pavlova Metro stop). Also, just around the corner from Locus Workspace, you will find the market at náměstí Jiřího z Poděbrad where you can experience the cool, hip vibe of the Vinohrady neighborhood.

  1. #yummy

Treats are an inseparable part of the ‘Christmas Market’ experience. If you stroll around, you will find plenty of traditional gingerbread, mulled wine (svařák), spit-roasted ham, sausages, eggnog, Trdlo (“traditional” Czech dessert that appeared on the Czech scene in the early 2000s) and all kinds of Christmas cookies. If you’re living in the Czech Republic, you know that traditional Czech cuisine is far from vegetarian/vegan-friendly. Lucky for you, there will be healthy alternatives to traditional local holiday favorites and many food stalls will be serving healthy fare. So, go find your favorite and, “Dobrou chuť!”

  1. What else is going on?

There’s definitely more to Prague’s Christmas Markets than just eating (although we love that). Rich cultural programs will be accompanying the visitors with performances from both local and international artists, children’s workshops and plays for both children and adults. The stalls will be selling different Czech products which might make the perfect present for your loved ones. Look for some Christmas ornaments, wooden toys, glassware, scented candles, jewelry and gingerbread products.

  1. Time to talk

What about some chatting over mulled wine? Christmas is one of those times when nobody wants to be alone and there is a need to have good company. We’ve got you covered. As noted at the start of this blog, on Sunday, December 1st, Locus Workspace will host a get-together Meetup event for everyone who wants to have a walk around the Christmas Markets in Prague, have some goodies and spend time with individuals from all over the world. Let’s share each other’s stories and learn how Christmas is celebrated in your country. We meet at 3 PM at the Statue of Saint Wenceslas. Are we going to see you there?

Making Dreams Reality with NaNoWriMo

Making Dreams Reality with NaNoWriMo

by Beth Green

Today is Halloween, so it’s an appropriate day to ask: What are you afraid of? What specific dread creeps up on you in the dark, when you’re alone?

Many Locus members, I suspect, share one of my fears: The fear of leaving a dream unrealized.

That one project you’ve always wanted to dive into; a pool of potential that only you recognize. Whether that’s a side business you know would be a hit, a spec project that could have real damn legs if only you could take the time to tinker with it, or a creative oeuvre no one is paying for (yet) but you just know deserves to be made real.

A few months ago, Locus Workspace owner Will Bennis sent out a survey asking us about these types of projects. As he called them, “the ones that stay in your mind for years.”  Exactly half of the respondents confessed that they had nurtured a project idea for years that they had not yet managed to complete.

It is for this half of the population that National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) was created. And is this group within Locus Workspace that I would like to invite to the NaNoWriMo Write-Ins that I’ll be hosting on November 4th and 25th in the big conference room. (OK, I lied. All Locus members are invited!)

What is NaNoWriMo?

In case you’re not familiar with NaNoWriMo, a quick explanation: It’s a 30-day event, held in November, in which participants challenge themselves to write the first, hilariously messy draft of a 50,000-word novel. In other words, it’s an opportunity and a blueprint for setting aside time to get one of these big projects out of your head and into the real world.

For most NaNoWriMo participants, this is a novel, but NaNoRebels may choose to write a series of poems, or essays, or work on a thesis, or storyboard an indie film, or whatever their beautiful, messy minds come up with. In the past 15 years, I’ve personally used NaNoWriMo for momentum to edit existing drafts and do a series of travel memoir essays in addition to novel first drafts.

Now do every one of the projects that the estimated 400,000 participants (last year’s numbers) take on turn into a masterpiece? Maybe not. But many do. NaNoWriMo projects that ended up as published novels include Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen (later a movie), The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, and Wool by Hugh Howey.

Much like you might join the gym to help you get ready to run a marathon, or take salsa lessons to make sure that you don’t embarrass yourself at your cousin’s wedding next year, or any other kind of small incremental goal that leads up to something more significant, NaNoWriMo encourages you to think of novel writing as something that you practice a little bit each day to work towards one giant goal.

And that’s a takeaway for all of us.

OK, What’s a Write-in?

Though the NaNoWriMo founders maintained that everyone could write a novel with just the scraps of free time that we have when waiting for the tram, for rice to boil, for the conference call to be over, most of us find it helpful during the month to set aside longer chunks of time to write.

At the write-ins on Nov. 4 and 25, we’ll have a quiet, welcoming space (and coffee and donuts! And official NaNoWriMo swag!) for anyone who wants to come and work on their writing project. Often, we use Pomodoro sessions to help focus, and sometimes we set group goals or talk over plot problems. (For more info, check out my blog post from last year’s write-ins)

You are welcome to come to our write-ins, even if you’re not participating in the full NaNoWriMo event. The more, the merrier!

Happy writing!

RSVP links

Sun, Nov. 4th, 10:00-4:30
Sun, Nov. 25th, 10:00-4:30
http://meetu.ps/c/LTHg/jl88s/f

Other Opportunities to Write at Locus

Interested in other opportunities to work on a big project with the moral support of other writers? The Prague Writers’ group holds weekly critique-free writing sessions on Saturdays at Locus. Learn more at:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/263394070348958/

Member Profile: Beth Green

Beth Green is a freelance writer and cherished member of Locus Workspace. She comes from the western United States and has been living overseas since 2003. We wanted to find out a little more about Beth’s journey – as a traveler, a writer, and an avid participant of National Novel Writing Month. Read on to learn more about Beth’s passion for writing, her take on Locus Workspace, and the impact National Novel Writing Month (and writing in general) has had on her life.
What is your occupation?
I am a freelance writer and most of my clients come to me for copy writing, copy editing, or proofreading. I also do some consulting for small businesses. I really enjoy doing a variety of projects, ranging from writing brochures to grants to proofreading academic papers. Basically, if it has to do with words, in English, I try to help.
How did you get into this field?

I trained as a print journalist. I worked at a newspaper before I moved abroad. I actually taught English as a Second Language for about ten years. Teaching, however, takes a lot of energy. I started getting burned out and saw that I wasn’t benefiting my students. Then I decided to take the skills from journalism and teaching and channel them into communications.

 

Was writing a passion of yours all along?
Since I was maybe eight years old, I knew I would be a writer. After I moved overseas, I kept a travel blog pretty faithfully for about six years, and that was also the first niche for me as a freelance writer. I don’t do that kind of writing so much now.
What are you currently working on?
Right now I am working with a grant writer in the US, helping her with research and editing grant documents, which has been rewarding. I have other clients and projects, but some have to remain private. I also have an ongoing relationship with the First Medical Faculty at Charles University. I review papers for a group of research scientists before they send them out to journals. I should also remember to say I have been lucky enough to get business by word of mouth through Locus and assisted several Locus members with their projects. Thanks, guys!
What is a fun fact about you?
I have the cutest cat in Prague (pictured below). Her name is Nymeria (character from Game of Thrones).
Bonus fact: I grew up on a sailboat.
 
How did you get into coworking?
Well, I’ve lived in Prague twice. I came back the second time for my husband’s job, and it was a bit rushed. We slept on a friend’s floor for a couple months before we had our own housing. Needless to say, her apartment was not the best working environment, so I looked into workspaces right away. During that first year back in Prague, I kept full-time Locus membership. Now I am a virtual member, but it is nice to be able to switch memberships since my work flow tends to change depending on the season. I like that the space is here when I need it.
Why did you choose Locus Workspace?
I joined Locus in 2013. There were two clear choices for me at the time (both of which I found online), but I liked that Locus seemed more geared towards English speakers. When I toured the space, everyone was really friendly.
What is your favorite part about working at Locus?
I really like meeting people and that the space is clean and well-lit, the desks and chairs are comfortable, and there’s a kitchen. I feel like it removes all the stress that can come from working in a café (like the power plug problem, the wifi connection problem, etc.).
If you could use one word to describe Locus, what would it be?

Welcoming.

 

On Writing and National Novel Writing Month

 

What motivates you to write?
This is the eternal question for a lot of writers and it is not easy to answer. Though I’ve been writing since childhood, I didn’t see myself as a fiction writer for a long time. Just about the same time I started NaNoWriMo, I started writing fiction. Writing a story that is long and completely from your own inspiration is really daunting, especially at the beginning. This is one of the reasons I like NaNoWriMo, because the challenge to write 50,000 words in a month pushes you and gives you a space to experiment with this long-form, imaginative writing.
Do you have a favorite project you’ve worked on?
Most of my fiction projects are crime fiction – mystery, thrillers, suspense. A big theme I tend towards is cross-culture topics, not necessarily having to do with borders but also people who are outside of their norm and trying to survive in an environment they are not comfortable in. For example, I have a story about an inept assassin that was published in an anthology earlier this year and it is about this woman who tries to do a job she really is not suited for.
 
Interested in Beth’s work? Take a peak at her anthology here.
When and why did you start being involved in NaNoWriMo events?
I’ve been attempting NaNoWriMo since 2003, and with each attempt I became more convinced I could actually do it. I think if you got a group of ten people together and asked them if they ever thought about writing a novel, probably all of them would say yes. Everybody has an idea for a novel or screenplay or some sort of story that they would like to tell and so of course I had that too. NaNoWriMo gave me a space to experiment. Not all of my projects from NaNoWriMo have been spectacular, but all of them helped me learn something, either about myself or about writing.
What has been your favorite/most impactful experience during NaNoWriMo?
I moved to China in 2006, where I lived in a town with few foreigners in it. Because NaNoWriMo is web-based, I was able to connect with other people, both foreigners and Chinese who were English speakers. After two months of living there, I was a little bit lonely and so it was really nice for me to meet other people that shared passion for writing with me. We all went to Starbucks, something familiar, and got together to write novels. It was really nice to know that I could find something I enjoyed in Prague, in the United States, anywhere. I think that is something very cool about NaNoWriMo, that no matter where you are in the world, you can find other people who share your interests.
What advice would you give to people who are interested in NaNoWriMo or writing in general?
A lot people get hung up on the rules of NaNoWriMo – the idea is that you are supposed to sign up and write 50,000 words in a month. A lot of people look at that, and think, Oh my goodness I am never going to write 50,000 words. But, I think that you need to approach it as guidelines rather than rules and I think those people with self-doubt about writing that many words should look at it more like an opportunity to write more than they would have without the challenge. Maybe you won’t write 50,000 words, but if you get to 10,000, that is 10,000 more words than you would have written otherwise. For example, my goal this month is to get to the end of the story arc and if I happen to write 50,000 words along the way, that’s great. So to me, NaNoWriMo is a self-improvement exercise as well as a creative exercise.
Want to hear more from Beth? Read her blog post on NaNoWriMo here.